The Isle of Wight Society

Isle of Wight Society and East Cowes Heritage

 

Welcome

The Isle of Wight Society

The Society was formed in 1969 by concerned residents in response to poor planning decisions, unsympathetic architectural design and mediocre construction of new developments. One of the first activities was to fight the Government over proposals to site a nuclear power station on the Solent coastline. 

The Isle of Wight Society is an amenity and conservation organisation, registered with the Charity Commission, number 276986, and affiliated to the national organisation Civic Voice.

Our Constitution states that the Objects are: 

1. To stimulate public interest in the Isle of Wight.

2. To promote high standards of planning and architecture in or effecting the Isle of Wight.

3. To secure the preservation, protection, development and improvement of features of historic or public interest in the Isle of Wight.

The Society achieves the objectives by:

Writing articles for publications and a monthly column in the IOW County Press.

Holding an annual conservation award competition in conjunction with the Royal Institute of British Architects.

Submitting comments on building developments to the IOW Council Planning Department.

Supporting the East Cowes Heritage Centre and other organisations dealing with planning issues.


East Cowes Heritage Centre

The Isle of Wight Society operates from the Heritage Centre in Clarence Road, East Cowes. The centre is run by volunteers. It is an archive and exhibition space for artifacts and records of the town and the Island. Entry is free but opening times vary. See here.

What makes this Island special?

The character of the Island is basically rural with enough undulations to provide vistas of the countryside, the surrounding sea and the busy sheltered water of the Solent. 

The mainstay of the Island is tourism and this is bolstered by marine and engineering industries, some agriculture, forestry and fishing. As a popular retirement destination the care of the elderly is also a factor in the economy.

The geology, from chalk cliffs to sheltered valleys, provides a variety of soils that support a wide selection of flora and fauna 

The people who have lived on the Island have left a rich heritage that supports the history of a developing community that has been industrious, involved with civil and international wars and produced some word leading engineering achievements. 

Nowhere else in Britain can boast of human history ranging from pre-Neolithic times through to the present day.

Current concerns

The Island Council is permitting housing development in line with Government targets, it also has a PFI contract for the maintenance of the roads. The Island has fairly comprehensive medical services with strong links to Southampton and Portsmouth hospitals.

Housing developments, devolution of services and infrastructure support feature greatly in the present political climate. The Society, along with other bodies, are monitoring the issues and are voicing their concerns.

Public Meeting to be held on Saturday 18th June, 12.30 to 4.45pm at The Riverside Centre, Newport.

The Financial Future of the Isle of Wight

Guest Speakers: 

Alan Marriott from the County Press on Public Perception.
Charlotte Eisenhart, National Association of Local Councils (NALC) on the National Situation.
Harry Rees Isle of Wight Assoc of Local Councils (IWALC) on Legal Aspect of Island Status.
Cllr. Julia Baker-Smith, Planning, and Housing.
Cllr. Steve Stubbings on Social Services.
Question and Answer sessions to follow.



Come and join us


Isle of Wight Society
East Cowes Heritage Centre, 8 Clarence Road
East Cowes, PO32 6EP

Email: info@isleofwightsociety.org.uk
Tel: +44 (0) 1983 280310

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